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For Pets

If you would like advice and guidance on caring for your pet, we’re putting together a series of advice panels containing some basic information on feeding, caring for and training the most common pets that UK homes have.

Over time, we’ll add to this as much as we can though if you can’t find what you need here, please do call us or pop in to the shop. If we can’t help you there and then, we’ll try to point you in the right direction. We have good contacts with pet nutritionists, behavioural coaches, training and more.

We want to make sure that your pet has a long and happy life in your company. So, we’re taking our time to get this right, please bear with us and check back often for updates.

We have some special information below regarding coronavirus and your pets.

Your puppy’s first trip to the vet

Your puppy’s first trip to the vet

Before you bring your new puppy home, you should register with a local vet to make sure you’re prepared. When…
Dog Nutrition for a Balanced Diet

Dog Nutrition for a Balanced Diet

To keep them healthy, happy and active for as long as possible, your dog’s diet needs the right balance of…
Dangers of Rawhide as a Dog treat

Dangers of Rawhide as a Dog treat

Dangers of Rawhide Most dogs chew on rawhide for hours on end, and not only does it keep them busy,…
Why does my Dog eat poo?

Why does my Dog eat poo?

Copraphagia is the term used for poo eating. It is a bad habit and not a medical problem. There are…
During Halloween

During Halloween

Pets and fireworks Did you know 80% of pet owners have owned a pet afraid of fireworks? Do you always…
Walking your dog in the dark

Walking your dog in the dark

With the clocks changing at the end of October it can only mean one thing, long nights. It can be…
Tips for bringing home a new kitten

Tips for bringing home a new kitten

Bringing home, a new kitten can enrich your life greatly. Whether the new kitten is your first pet or an…
Looking after your Rabbits this winter

Looking after your Rabbits this winter

Temperature: Rabbits do not cope well with extreme weather temperatures so you need to ensure their home stays warm, comfortable…

Check instore for our range of hay and straw, as well as other small animal products!

Fish

Fish

Coming Soon

Coming soon.

Getting started with guinea pigs

Getting started with guinea pigs

Getting started with guinea pigs Guinea pigs originate from Peru where they would roam in family groups, usually a male,…
Looking after your Guinea Pigs this winter

Looking after your Guinea Pigs this winter

Looking after your Guinea Pigs this winter Guinea Pigs cannot cope with the cold weather and really must be brought…

 

Come and visit for a range of hay and straw to keep them warm and check out the other small animal products!

Getting started with keeping chickens

Getting started with keeping chickens

Getting started with keeping chickens Keeping a few chickens in the back yard really is quite straight forward, but first…
Feeding Wild Birds this winter

Feeding Wild Birds this winter

Many small birds die of cold over the winter months. By putting out a little extra food you can really…
COVID-19 and my pets:

Following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), pet owners are becoming increasingly concerned about the virus and whether it will affect their pets.

Dr Jessica May, a UK Lead Vet at video vet service, FirstVet, explained if your animals can get coronavirus:

“The short answer is no: there are currently no suspicions that pets can be infected, or that they can spread COVID-19 to humans. That said, there are numerous strains of coronavirus that affect animals: canine coronavirus (CCV), which is highly contagious amongst dogs, and feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is an illness that can manifest from coronavirus infection in cats. These strains of the virus spread from animal to animal, but cannot be transmitted to humans.

What we know so far:

A variety of coronavirus strains occur worldwide, and some of these also affect our pets in the UK. Canine coronavirus disease in dogs (CCV) does not affect people but is highly infectious for dogs and causes outbreaks of intestinal infection, which is short-lived but tends to cause significant abdominal pain. CCV was first detected in 1970 and has since been found across the world, but currently it is not in the UK. Majority of cases of CCV arise due to oral contact with infected faeces, as well as from contaminated food bowls, or nose to nose contact with an infected dog. Dogs may not show signs for up to four days after exposure and clinical signs usually last for between 2 and 10 days.

Occasionally, dogs develop sudden-onset diarrhoea with a decreased appetite and lethargy. Mortality rates are low, but deaths have been reported. The infection is typically more severe in puppies, as they have a weaker immune system. There is no treatment for CCV since the infection usually resolves by itself.

COVID-19 in dogs:

The Pomeranian of an infected owner was tested ‘weakly positive’ for COVID-19 in Hong Kong, after swabs were taken from its nose and mouth in routine testing. The dog, which is showing no relevant clinical signs, was removed from the household and was placed under quarantine where re-testing was performed to determine whether the dog was in fact infected or whether its mouth and nose were being contaminated with COVID-19 virus from the household. So, there is no evidence to prove the your pets can be infected with this particular coronavirus.

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) is urging pet owners in areas where there are known human cases of COVID-19 to continue to follow the information in its Advisory, including washing their hands when interacting with their pets.

When should you contact a vet?

The signs of coronavirus can easily be confused with other diseases, so please seek veterinary advice if your cat or dog has diarrhoea that does not resolve within 24 hours, or is associated with significant lethargy or loss of appetite.

I have coronavirus, what should I do with my pets?

Limit contact with pets and other animals while you are sick. Do not go on dog walks, instead exercise your dog in the garden or ask for help from other people such as a dog walker or boarder. If you have livestock and horses, ask for friends to help you take care of them. If you feel unwell ask friends or a boarder to take your pets to be looked after. If you have any concerns about your pet or your pet shows signs of ill health, please do not visit the vet but phone for advice. As you will be unable to take your pet to the vet yourself, have a plan so that someone else can do this on your behalf

I do not have coronavirus, what precautions should I take?

Washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before and after touching pets, their food, toys and bedding.  Avoid being kissed or licked and sharing food with your pet. Try and ensure you have supplies of pet food and medication if you need to ‘stay at home’ and speak to your vet for more advice. If you own a horse or livestock and keep them on land that is not based at your address, arrange for a friend to care for them until you’re able to return to normal. If possible, arrange for another person to care for your pet (you could consider using a dog walker or home boarder).